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COM 101: Public Speaking - King: NPR & Web

National Public Radio

Evaluating Information

Use the CRAP Test to think about web* sources you find

Currency

  • How recent is the information?
  • Is it current enough for your topic?
  • If the information is from a website, when was the site last updated?

Reliability

  • What kind of information is included in the resource?
  • Is content of the resource primarily opinion? Is is balanced?
  • Is it provided for a hobbiest, for entertainment, or for a serious audience?
  • Does the creator provide references or sources for data or quotations?

Authority

  • Who are the authors or creators?
  • What are their credentials? Can you find something out about them in another place?
  • Who is the publisher or sponsor?
  • Are they reputable?
  • What is the publisher’s interest (if any) in this information?
  • If it's from a website, does it have advertisements?

Purpose/Point of View

  • Is this fact or opinion?
  • Is it biased? Can you still use the information, even if you know there is bias?
  • Is the the site trying to sell you something, convert you to something or make you vote for someone?

*All information you find should be evaluated for  authority, and currency (ABC) but books and articles you find in the library have already gone through some screening (publishers, editors, librarians). What you find on the web must be evaluated totally by YOU!

adapted from Dominican University

Search Google

Google Web Search

Another Look at Evaluating the Web

This 8 point evaluative system from Lesley University (Boston University) contains great examples.